The Carnation Revolution: Celeste Caeiro

Saraiva de Carvalho, the military man who led the coup that brought down Salazar’s dictatorship, has died in Portugal this week. But his story would have been very different if it had not been for a cafeteria worker who with her gesture changed the history of her country. She is Celeste Caeiro.

 

April 25, 1974 seemed like a day like any other in Portugal, a country that had not held elections since 1925. But the dictatorial regime of Salazar, succeeded by Marcello Caetano, was about to collapse thanks to the carnations of Celeste Caeiro, a humble worker in a Lisbon café.

Arriving at her workplace, she discovered that that day was anything but normal: during the previous night, there had been a military uprising against the Portuguese dictatorial regime; the soldiers had occupied strategic points in the country, such as ports and airports, and had asked the population to stay at home. The captain Otelo Saraiva de Carvalho led the operation.

Seeing that the situation could become critical, the manager of the café sent home all his workers with a request: since the situation made it impossible to celebrate the anniversary of the café as they had planned, he asked his employees to take home with them the carnations they had purchased for the celebration. 

Caeiro, however, ignored the warning of her boss and her friends. Instead of heading home, she decided to take the subway towards the centre of Lisbon, to the well-known Plaça de Rossío, to be able to observe how the events were evolving. 

 

The day flowers replaced weapons

Full of curiosity, she approached a soldier to ask him what was going on, and he asked her for a cigarette. Unfortunately, she didn’t have any, so she thought of buying him something to eat, but due to the coup, all the nearby shops and restaurants were closed. Therefore, she gave him the only thing she had at the time: a carnation.

The soldier did not hesitate to place the carnation in the hole of the rifle he was carrying, symbolizing the unwillingness to fire his weapon. Then the rest of the soldiers in the squad followed the example of the first soldier, and as Caeiro handed them the carnations she had, they were placed in the same way.

Ironically, this gesture spread like wildfire through the square and across the city, making visible the intention of the revolutionaries not to fire their weapons. Once the government of the regime surrendered, the carnations ended up becoming the symbol of the revolution and the reason for its name.

 

The absence of recognition for Celeste Caeiro

Many times we tend to focus on the most beautiful and positive parts of stories, but it’s also worth acknowledging the negative ones. In this case, the absence of recognition that Caeiro has suffered throughout her life.

Despite having given name to the revolution that changed the course of her country, Caeiro is still unknown to many of her countrymen. Instead of receiving tributes, she still survives with the minimum pension of 370 euros, which is largely spent on the rent of her flat. This situation should make us think about the treatment we sometimes give to those who give everything without asking for anything in return.

 

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After a year of pandemic, the festival returns to Barcelona stronger and more confident than ever. A must-attend event for lovers of design, innovation and craftsmanship.

 

What is Palo Market Fest?

The former Gal i Puigsech factory, in the middle of the industrial neighbourhood of Poblenou, has become a space of creative reference thanks to the Fundació Palo Alto, which has turned this venue into a cluster of artistic and cultural creation businesses. In addition, for some years now the venue has hosted the Palo Market Fest, which traditionally takes place on the first weekend of the month and, following the dynamics of the space, hosts a very special event where there is no shortage of brands of all kinds, culinary proposals from all over the world and live music to liven up the day.

 

The cradle of trends

Seven years after its creation, it has established itself as a reference market, both for locals and visitors, and currently has more than 30 design exhibitors for all tastes: jewellery, art, second-hand clothes, vintage, sustainable or accessories, in a selection of proposals for all sexes and ages. The wide range of artisan brands offers original and exclusive products that make the Market a unique experience.

Fourteen premium companies close the line-up with the most innovative proposals on the market, where emerging talent, design and functionality meet to create sustainable, quality products where less is always more.

 

The 3Ms of Palo Alto: eating, music and fashion

Live music fills every corner with the “Street music experience“, which livens up the day from different stages.

And also in terms of food, the Market has become the reference venue for the food-truck sector in the city. They manage to bring together all kinds of culinary and multicultural proposals, without forgetting healthy and vegetarian food.

 

Limited capacity and pre-sale tickets

This weekend is the last summer edition of the festival, which due to the pandemic restrictions is divided into two shifts: from 13:00 h to 18:00 h and from 18:30 h to 23:00 h, with a maximum capacity of 950 people. Admission costs €5 and can be purchased exclusively through the VERSE application. Children under the age of twelve and people with reduced mobility or disabilities and their companions will be admitted free of charge.

 

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When you hear the term summer hit, what comes to mind: Georgie Dann, The Refreshments, King Africa, Don Patricio? It depends on the generation you belong to. But what are the summer hits in Catalan?

 

Globalisation and the popularity of Catalan brands, especially beer brands, mean that the songs they use reach more people, but we can consider that the birth of the summer hit in Catalan took place in 1990, when TV3 commissioned the popular group La Trinca to compose a song to be used in the channel’s summer programme advert, which would be used for three summers, covered by different performers.

In 1993, the summer hit in Catalan was Munta-t’ho bé, by Els Pets. It was from this year onwards that the groups or singers chosen to provide the soundtrack for the TV3 summer advert opted to adapt their own songs, instead of composing one exclusively for television. In many cases, this has given them a popularity they did not have before. In recent years, radio stations have also signed up and commissioned versions for the summer campaign. A new channel of visibility for songs in Catalan.

 

Create your summer playlist

Beyond the world of advertising, here are 20 songs in Catalan that you can’t miss on your summer playlist:

 

What does a summer hit have to be like?

The phenomenon known as the summer hit has its origins in the Italian music festival “Un disco per l’estate” (1964), aimed at discovering new talent and imitating the success of the San Remo Festival.

The Italian idea crossed the Mediterranean, and in 1966 the summer hit hashtag became popular with the creation of the programme “Los 40 principales” on Radio Madrid, although other stations such as Radio Miramar and Radio Juventud were also already choosing their summer hits.

The summer hit, by definition, is “is a song that is released and peaks in its popularity during summer“. In this particular aspect, they became popular, especially thanks to Latin artists, but also artists of other nationalities who translated their songs into Spanish in order to succeed in this large market, such as Georgie Dann, a French national.

Today, radio and television in Catalonia also incorporate Catalan-language songs, marked by their energy or their lyrics. The challenge, however, is to get them to cross borders. And you, what song would you add to your summer playlist?

 

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In these turbulent and difficult times for the tourism sector, it seems that there is an area that resists and maintains a high level of activity: wine tourism, or visits to wine environments. What opportunities does this type of tourism offer to a sector currently below minimums due to the pandemic?

 

Tourism that adapts to the new normal

It has been more than a year since the fateful March 2020, but tourism figures in Catalonia are still well below what used to be normal. These harmful effects are not only due to the restrictions imposed by governments: many people, whether local or foreign, have changed their habits and prefer to avoid visiting crowded or claustrophobic places. 

Obviously, this point has harmed establishments in many parts of the Catalan geography that had specialized in this type of mass tourism. But, at the same time, and against all odds, it seems that it is increasing visits to wineries of our country.

This is an activity away from mass tourism and with many facilities for the visitor, who can spend a quiet time away from the stress of the city, and enjoy the gastronomic wonders that are offered. This favours the maintenance of social distance, which, together with the absence of overcrowding, provides a greater sense of security to visitors.

What interest does it have for tourists?

From the customer’s point of view, wine tourism offers many advantages over other types of tourism. For starters, Catalonia is a very rich country in wineries: there are many denominations of origin (Penedès, Priorat, Empordà…), all of them well distributed throughout the territory, so any Catalan has multiple wineries near their home that they can visit, either in a short getaway or for a few days.

The other key feature is its versatility. Wine tourism is not only visiting wineries. It also allows you to live other experiences such as wine tasting, visiting local museums, enjoying gastronomy, or simply taking the opportunity to visit the towns in the area, in a much more relaxed atmosphere than in large cities.

All this has allowed wine tourism to grow remarkably, and statistics confirm that more and more young and middle-aged people are interested in visiting wineries in their area. Today almost 20% of the visitors are less than thirty-five years of age, and more than 32% are between 35 and 45 years old, a trend that is increasing year after year. 

What does it mean for wineries?

As for the wineries, the fact of promoting themselves as a wine tourism proposal provides them with many benefits, starting with the income. During the first months of the pandemic, wine consumption fell almost 15%, which caused great financial problems for many small wine companies, many of them family-owned, which could not guarantee the payment of debts.

The rise of rural tourism, and by extension wine tourism, has been a great help to the sector. It has opened a new line of income thanks to visitors, who in general tend to have a higher purchasing power than in other tourist activities.

This avalanche of visitors indirectly helps the food sector too, as many of these wine tourists take the opportunity to live gastronomic experiences focused on local products.

Future perspectives and recommendations

Despite the advantages and synergies it provides, we must also see a negative point: so far, the full potential of wine tourism has not been exploited. We still have few visitors to our wineries, in relation to other countries in our area with a wine-making tradition, such as France or Italy. While these countries have between 15 and 10 million oenological tourists each year, the latest estimates say that in Catalonia we do not exceed one million. In Spain, there is a similar situation: just over 3 million visitors.

The advantages of wine tourism, as described, are an important potential for our wine companies and, therefore, the future of the sector must consider this activity and contribute to its promotion and popularization. This type of tourism, with a lot less seasonality (its peak is usually in the autumn and spring), can also help regulate tourism in our country, mostly sun and beach tourism concentrated in the summer period.

The recommendation for this summer is to visit a winery in our territory, in an original and enriching experience where you can enjoy nature and the surrounding environment. Catalonia has a wide range of wineries. However, if you do not know which to choose, we recommend one of the winners of this year’s Vinari Awards, such spending a few days at the BUIL&gINÉ Hotel (DOQ Priorat) awarded as the best wine tourism accommodation; spending a few hours at the Celler Llopart (Corpinnat-Penedès) awarded for the best proposal for “Live the harvest of 1887”; or pairing wine and food at the Garden Restaurant El Cellaret of the Família Torres winery (DO Penedès).

 

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Although we really like to spend the day on the beach, bathe, and enjoy a good time near the sea, it never hurts to remember a few tips so as not to suffer more than necessary under the strong and warm summer sun.

 

The sun is not bad for our skin, on the contrary: solar radiation is critical so that our body can synthesize vitamin D, an essential vitamin that helps absorb calcium and strengthen our immune system.

In fact, there are countries that, during the winter or some times of the year, almost cannot enjoy sunlight (such as various places in the Arctic Circle), and it is recommended that those who travel there during these times and stay there for a relatively long time take vitamin D in capsules, so as not to suffer harmful effects on the body. 

 

Between too little and too much sun

It is estimated that, given the power of the sun in summer, there is no need for more than 10 or 15 minutes of daily exposure to the sun to receive the amount of vitamin D needed per day. From here, then, a continuous and unprotected exposure can cause very harmful effects on our skin. 

That is why it is very important not to underestimate the effects of spending too many hours on the beach, and take sufficient protective measures to be able to enjoy a good holiday without having to suffer the negative consequences of excessive sun exposure.

Avoid noon

For starters, very important: the schedule. We all know that in the morning, when the sun is rising, it is less hot. The same happens at the end of the day, during sunset. This is because, due to the rotation of the Earth, there are times of the day when the sun’s rays hit us more directly: it is what is popularly known as “a burning sun”.

These hours of maximum solar power are usually around noon, from 12 to 4 p.m., and these are the times to avoid indiscriminate solar exposure: we will put ourselves in the shade, go for a drink, or go home for lunch. 

 

Sunscreen, all year round!

But while we avoid the most dangerous hours, the star king is still up there, so we need to protect our skin as well. This implies, above all, using a good sunscreen which helps us to withstand the harmful effects of excess ultraviolet rays.

It is best to use a +50 protection factor sunscreen in the exposed areas of the body, and apply it again at least every two hours. It should also be noted that if we go to the water to cool off, the protective effect of the cream will quite possibly last less, and we’ll have to apply it again sooner.

Furthermore, it is important not to forget certain parts of the body, such as the ears or feet, because we often forget they are also exposed, so as not to wake up the next day with an unpleasant surprise in the form of burns.

 

The hat as a complement

Sunburn has a problem, however: there are areas that are not entirely accessible for it. One is obviously hair. Despite thinking that hair already protects ours capillary area, the truth is that continued exposure can cause us future problems.

So how can we avoid it? While spray sunscreens for hair are becoming more popular lately, the most logical and also the most traditional solution is very easy: use a cap or hat. In this way, we can protect our hair area without any problems.

If we follow all these tips, and we also hydrate ourselves well every few hours, nothing will stop us from enjoying a great summer on the beach, in the mountains, or in the place we prefer!

Have a nice summer!

 

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Who decides the colours of the summer? Do you know the Pantone Color Institute? We explain why you find what you find on the street and on social media.


We are already well into summer and, as with every change of season, what we will wear or see on the street or on the beach has been meticulously studied by experts who analyse the trends. Today we want to update you on the trends for this summer 2021, and we will do it with three small brushstrokes: we will delve into the current colours, we will review the trend predictions, and we will find out what the fashion is like online.a

 

Coral, lilac, yellow or fuchsia, the trendy colours of the summer

Who decides what fashion colours we see in magazines, what TV presenters and influencers wear, or what we will see people wearing during summer? This is the work of the Pantone Color Institute, Pantone’s trend forecasting and colour consultancy. They are, to a large extent, the ones who set the colours that will be worn. Each season they produce a report suggesting the top ten colours and the five classic neutral colours to wear.

For this summer, Pantone goes for vitality through bright colours, such as orangey yellow, sky blue, navy blue, earthy brown, light green, mint green, coral, lilac, yellow and fuchsia. As for the season’s classics, they suggest blackened blue, grey, cream, earthy and willow green. According to Leatrice Eiseman, executive director of the Pantone Color Institute, this summer’s colours combine energy, relaxation and comfort in order to improve our mood, which is probably what we need most right now.

Trends for all tastes

As with colours, fashion trends are also analysed and prepared in advance. There are companies that are dedicated to making reports on what will be worn, anticipating two years in advance the fashion that we will find on the street. According to the analyst and trend forecaster Rosalina Villanueva, from WGSN – a company dedicated exclusively to forecasting trends – this summer’s trends are comfort, futuristic style, retro, pop, sailor style, safari looks, evaporated materials, floral, minimalism and environmentally friendly materials.

Social media, the new trend incubator

But fashion is not only found in the colours decided by Pantone or the most expert analysts. Fashion can also be found in social networks. Every surfer and with a little attention everyone can observe the top trends of this summer: Bucket hats, crochet clothing and accessories, colourful jewellery, espadrilles, XXL shirts, flip-flops sandals, net bags, asymmetrical pieces, Bermuda shorts, Vichy checks, tie-dye or Ibiza-style dresses and clothes, are just some of the fashion trends that we can find this summer, according to the fashion that is followed on social media.

Finally, let’s remember that this summer fashion is full of happiness; it’s not about being the most modern or the one who wears the latest trends, but about bringing out our personality and the most authentic energy interpreted through the pieces we wear. And last but not least, don’t miss these seasonal basics: The smile and the good mood; which are the most upward trend that we will always find, season after season.

 

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We propose six titles that will accompany you this summer and will allow you to get to know and experience new realities without leaving the sofa. Six stories that transport us and make us dream, make us uncomfortable and prompt us to be critical of society, but without losing hope.

 

  • Wild Wild Country (Netflix)
    In the early 1980s, the Indian guru Bhagwan Shree Rajneesh (Osho) arrived in the small town of Wasco County, in the United States, to build the Rajneeshpuram community. Hundreds of people followed in his footsteps. A true story, with images and real witnesses, that illustrates the rise and fall of this wild sect based on free love and meditation that changed the life of this town.

 

  • Small axe (Prime video / Movistar+)
    “If you are the big tree, We are the small axe, Sharpened to cut you down”. With this song by Bob Marley, filmmaker Steve McQueen gives name to this story about the racial violence of the Afro-Caribbean community in the UK in the 1960s. Courage and struggle against social and institutional oppression, told through five chapters with five different stories that will not leave you indifferent.

 

  • It’s a sin (HBO)
    The 80s and 90s were the dark ages of the HIV crisis. The series is set in this context to describe how the situation was experienced through the eyes of a group of young people. Vitality, freedom and naivety. The 1980s were seen as the era of change, of neocapitalism, of the arrival of new music, of new freedoms, but did society advance at the same pace? The irruption of the disease and the global upheaval it provoked also led to an increase in homophobia. A view that is still relevant today, in a world where neither the disease nor the stigma has yet been eradicated.

  • The Underground Railroad (Prime Video)
    The small screen welcomes the adaptation of Colson Whitehead’s novel in this historical drama about the struggle against slavery. In the 19th century, a railway is created to help slaves escape and lead them to freedom by taking them to safety. A tough story but a fascinating tale.

 

  • When they see us
    Five young men convicted of a rape they did not commit. A true story that shocked American public opinion and that is now explained to the whole world through this harsh but necessary series. Police frame-ups, social pressure, lies and the need to solve the case immediately, regardless of the evidence. Since its premiere in 2019 it has positioned itself as one of Netflix’s critically acclaimed gems.

 

  • Years and years (HBO / Movistar+)
    Describes a new reality in the UK, practically anticipating future scenarios. A world unsteadily subject to political, social and technological changes that will make the lives of the protagonists evolve towards very different positions. Six chapters narrate the life of the Lyons family over the course of fifteen years in which the viewer will feel identified and will observe, uncomfortably, possible scenarios that we could all live through, in pure Black Mirror style.

 

And for you, what are this summer’s best series?

 

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Food is an essential part of any trip, both the food you discover at the place of arrival and the food you take with you from home. Let’s review the basics for travelling with food.

 

The importance of food, whether for the cultural basis or the need for energy, means that when we travel we face various dilemmas, such as: Where to eat? What to eat? Eating at a restaurant or taking food with us in a home-made lunch box? Eating before leaving home or doing so when we arrive at our destination?

What we need to know is that, no matter what option we choose, the best we can do is avoid travelling when we are hungry. It is necessary that, before starting a journey, we leave home with a full stomach, as this will make us optimistic and will make us face any problem that may arise with more energy and positivity.

I want to take my food from home. How should I do it?

Once I have decided that I want to take my food with me, I need to know that, depending on the means of transport I use, I will have to transport it differently. For example, if I fly from one European Union country to another, there are usually no restrictions on carrying food on the plane. We can travel with products of animal origin, as Member States are supposed to comply with Community veterinary standards. If the trip is outside the European Union, you will need to consult the regulations of each country to find out whether they will let us introduce our food and how to do it. 

On the other hand, if we travel by car, what worries us most is what foods to put in the lunch box so that once cooked or processed they retain their properties, both in terms of preservation and taste. Therefore, it is necessary to keep the lunch box at the right temperature, this being a maximum of 5 °C for cold foods and around 65 °C for hot foods. In case the heat cannot be maintained, it is better to refrigerate the food and heat it before consuming it. Recommendations such as the desirability of using hygienic foods, cured in the case of dairy products, and avoiding preparations containing raw egg should also be taken into account.

We are what we eat

As the La dieta Mediterrània un estil de vida actual document by the Alice Foundation highlights, “The need to recover the Mediterranean diet has become a constant demand for decades. The different researches carried out on the food patterns that characterize the developed societies of our time lead to surprising conclusions: we do not eat well, we have unlimited access to certain food products, and in our society more and more important states of malnutrition are detected. Pathologies specific to our environment — overweight and obesity, anaemia, decalcification and osteoporosis, caries, cardiovascular disease, diabetes, retinopathy and macular degeneration, constipation and digestive disorders, and degenerative diseases, such as Alzheimer’s or cancer — are, in many cases, related to diet that the patient has followed throughout his life. And diet can be, if not the cause, the trigger of the malfunction of the body […].”

Mediterranean culture

The panellets, chestnuts, and sweet potatoes that are consumed for the feasts of All Saints and the Day of the Dead; the nougat for Christmas; the omelettes and other preparations for Fat Thursday; the doughnuts for Lent; the ring-shaped cake for the Kings’ day; the cream for St. Joseph; the cakes for the festivals of Sant Joan and Sant Pere; the mones for Easter…

The history of our land is closely linked to Mediterranean culture. Mediterranean people share similar characteristics, one of which is the fact of enjoying social life around a table, enjoying the dishes and stews that are presented to be tasted while talking a mile a minute and having a good time.

Our culinary culture has its origins in medieval times. In Catalonia, we have one of the first manuals of recipes, gastronomy, and wines in Europe, the Llibre de Sent Soví, from the 13th century, which is an anonymous medieval recipe book. Also, in the words of Josep Pla, we have the first best-seller of the culinary world: it is the Llibre del coch from the 16th century, by the master Robert de Nola, cook of King Ferdinand of Naples. Today, Catalan cuisine is known and recognized internationally.

What is the energy value of food?

The energy value of food is proportional to the energy released when that food is burned, in the presence of oxygen. This released energy is measured in calories.

A calorie is the amount of heat needed to raise the temperature of one gram of water by one degree Celsius. It is a very small unit and, for this reason, kilocalories (1 kcal = 1,000 calories) are usually used for food.

The human body, when in a state of absolute rest and constant body temperature, consumes a certain amount of energy. This amount of energy is called the basal metabolic rate (BMR), and is needed to maintain vital signs. The following formulas are used to calculate the daily rate of basal metabolism:

  • Women: BMR = 655 + 9.6 · W + 1.8 · H – 4.7 · A 
  • Men: BMR = 66 + 13,7 · W + 5 · H – 6,8 · A 

In these formulas, W is the weight in kilograms, H is the height measured in centimetres, and A is the age in years.

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The contest sponsored by 11Onze awards the best young wines and the best wine tourism proposals

 

The Catalan wine sector has experienced an unmissable event this Friday, July 9, in the auditorium of Vilafranca del Penedès. The Vinari Awards, the most prestigious in the world of wine in Catalonia, have celebrated the summer gala, seeking the normalization of the sector despite anti-Covid precautions.

The event, organized by Vadevi and presented by Maria Almenar, has recognized the best young wines and the best wine tourism proposals and, therefore, has given very relevant information to consumers for summer season. A representation of the 11Onze team, led by the CEO, Natàlia Cugueró, was present at the event with the aim of supporting a key industry in our country for the economy, landscape and sustainability.

The Vinari have recognized a total of 64 wines, 4 of which have won the Vinari Gran Or award and will receive a distinctive label that will make them recognizable in stores. They are as follows:

  • Best young white wine: LaFou Els Amelers 2020, by LaFou Celler (DO Terra Alta)
  • Best young red wine: Black 2020 from the MontRubí winery (DO Penedès)
  • Best rosé wine: Masia Freyé Syrah Sumoll 2020, Vallformosa (DO Penedès)
  • Best young sparkling wine (up to 18 months old): Honor Cava Brut Ecològic 2019, Celler Jan Vidal (DO CAVA)

The gala, paired with the performance of the jazz group The Summer Lovers, brought together Catalan institutions around wine. In addition to Natàlia Cugueró, the mayoress of Rubí, Ana Maria Martínez, presented awards; the general director of the Catalan Institute of Vine and Wine, Alba Balcells; the Mayor of Vilafranca del Penedès, Pere Regull and the Minister for Climate Action, Food and the Rural Agenda, Teresa Jordà.

The best wine tourism proposals were also chosen at the Vinari:

  • Award for the best wine tourism accommodation: Hotel BUIL & GINÉ from the winery BUIL & GINÉ, Gratallops (DOQ Priorat)
  • Award for the best wine tourism project in the category of catering and pairing experience: Garden Restaurant El Celleret de Família Torres, Pacs del Penedès (DO Penedès)
  • Award for the best wine tourism visit and wine tasting experience: Celler Masia Serra, Cantallops (DO Empordà)

If you want to know the rest of the wines and wine tourism activities awarded at the Summer Wineries, you will find them at this link.

 

After the gala, the audience chatted with a mask outside the auditorium of Vilafranca. The general feeling was one of satisfaction, with the desire for the pandemic to allow the next awards to be handed out as normal. The next appointments for the 2021 Wine Awards are on September 13 at the Celler de Rubí and on October 8 with the big autumn gala in Vilafranca del Penedès. 11Onze will be present, next to the world of wine.

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This Friday, July 9, the Vinari Awards will acknowledge the best young wines and wine tourism proposals in the country. 11Onze will be present as the main sponsor.

 

The Vinari Awards, organised by vadevi.cat, award the best Catalan wines of the year since 2013. In this edition, the first Catalan fintech community, 11Onze, joins the project as a sponsor. The aim is to raise awareness of the quality of Catalan wines and to support a key industry in our country.

According to data from Prodeca, the wine industry has a turnover of €1,200 million per year in Catalonia, and its structure is made up of more than 600 bottling wineries, 8,359 winegrowers and an area of 42,822 hectares, registered as Catalan PDO. In terms of employment, the sector employs 25,900 people, including vineyards, wineries, and services. Exports in the past 2020 have reached €522.13 million, which represents 4.57% of Catalan exports. Catalonia is and has been a land of wines, and according to INCAVI, the Catalan Institute of Vine and Wine, wine has been part of our culture and tradition for over 2,300 years.

The summer gala of the awards will be held this Friday, July 9, 2021, at seven in the afternoon, in the Auditorium of Vilafranca del Penedès, with the presence of the general director of 11Onze, Natalia Cugueró.

In this ninth edition of the Vinari, in addition to the October gala, a summer gala is held announcing the winners of the awards for the best young wines. One of the reasons for doing this is that they are very suitable wines to consume at this time of year. The Wine Tourism Awards will also be awarded, in collaboration with the School of Wine Tourism of Catalonia. Awards will be given to the best young white wines, the best young red wines, the best rosé wines, and the best young sparkling wines. Prizes will also be awarded for the best wine tourism accommodation, the best restaurant projects and pairing experience, the best wine tourism visit and wine tasting experience, and the best wine tourism activity of the year. The awards will continue with a wine tasting competition, on Monday 13 September, at the Celler de Rubí, which will precede the Autumn Gala, on 8 October, which will be held again in Vilafranca del Penedès.

The Vinari Awards are a determining factor in prescribing Catalan wines, in the same way that the Concours Mondial de Bruxelles or the Parker Guide scores can be at an international level. The Vinari Awards are widely covered by the media and are broadcast live on Catalan public television. This year, a total of 852 different wines have been presented, which compete in the various categories through a blind tasting by a jury of 70 experts – oenologists and sommeliers – including foreign tasters.

Consumers associate Catalan wines with quality, proximity and identity. These characteristics combine perfectly with the idea of 11Onze, which is aimed, preferably, at these same consumers.

 

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